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is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
women in the civil rights movement. also served as president of the national council of negro women for more than now decades. she lived to be 98. her memoir of released when she was 91. that's when i asked her about her experiences as a woman working with predominantly male civil rights leaders. >> i have a peer relationship with those men. because what we were looking at was, the issue was about civil rights. it was about justice, about equality. and to be able to join hands and work with men of the great strength of those men on that cause meant that it was not a matter of male and female. it was -- >> she sees tremendous progress for african american women during the past 60 years despite what she calls the double handicap of race and gender. she credits civil rights laws including the civil rights act of 1964 and voting rights act of 1965 as well as the women's movement. which some activists claim haven't done enough. this progress proves women of color needn't choose between race and gender. >> when we advanced in the civil rights laws it didn't help just black people. it help
it when we come right back ms. megyn kelly on whether the supreme court will buy gay marriage as a civil rights issue. and then a great american news quiz returns tonight. the bad parents edition. maccallum and doocy warming up maccallum and doocy warming up and we will be right having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. adt can help you turn on a few lights. access cameras from anywhere to help you keep an eye on things. even bring family in from the cold when you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 and save $300. with adt, you get 24/7 fast response monitoring that helps protect you from burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. plus remote access to your home. even control your thermostat to help save energy and money. get adt installed starting at just $99. that's a $300 savings. you may even save up to 20% on your homeowners ins
have cast it as a civil right? >> i think that's definitely part of it, and pop culture is a big part of it. as, you know, seeing same-sex couples has become more normal, more mainstream. people are used to see it and more gay couples feel comfortable telling people around them this is who i am, this is my family. that really changes mores. there was already a huge generational gap but now we're seeing major shifts through all generations. for first time white catholics support -- a majority of white catholics support same-sex marriage. >> marco rubio was asked about his views on same-sex marriage. let me play you what he said. here he is. >> is homosexuality a sin? >> i can tell you what faith teaches and the faith teaches it is. as a policymaker, you know, i could just tell you that i'm informed by my faith and my faith informs me in who i am as a person, but not as a way to pass judgment on people. >> okay. so rubio says his faith informs him that its a sin but he's not going to cast judgment on others. he's not going to point the finger, but can rubio fight an election in that fud
a deal with civil rights attorneys who have been demanding reforms the agreement ends a 12 year legal battle over the vigilante justice administered by the rogue o=p=d officers known as the riders. >> and in san francisco: backpacks and briefcases .... blackberries and bottles of tequila. if you've lost any of these items to thieves ... the san francisco police may have some good news for you. >> the officers did a great job recovering in a with like to get it back to the rightful owners. >>pam: developing tonight at eight.. the city of oakland's deal. to stave off a federal takeover of its beleagured police department has brought years of legal battles to a sudden end. kron-4's philippe djegal is live in oakland tonight.. .. with details.. and what this means for the department.. going forward. >> pam, the community town hall meeting tonight at the elementary school in oakland was supposed to be about what the police department is doing to tackle crime. also the economic state of the city. and the jobs it was all discussed but over shattered by even bigger news. in a stunning
makers realize the real issues relate to helping support and extend the civil rights of people today. with autism, that process is still going on, but i am confident because i believe this is a civil rights issue. i believe the united states of america can guarantee the civil rights of all its citizens. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. >> thank you mr. ne'eman. thank you to reach of the panelists. in regular order, the chair will recognize mr. burton from indiana. >> first of all, i want to thank you all very much. we talked to those people for three hours and you had to sit there. i want to tell you, i am amazed your posteriors could survive that long. the second thing i would like to say is that abraham lincoln said, let the people know the facts and the country will be saved. one of the things that we have is that i do not think there is enough information getting out to the people who are not effected. i was like that. my grandson became artistic, and then all of a sudden it became a cause for me. i was chairman at the time so i had the resources to do somet
in only the way she can. sued by civil rights groups for denying driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants who have been granted permits by the be obama administration to remain the in the united states. the deferred action program allows undocumented immigrants under 31 to avoid deportation if they arrived here before turning 16, have been in the country five straight years and are in school or have graduated from high school or a geds program or served in the military. brewer who has battled the obama administration over her state's immigration policies insists she's obeying laws. >> the state is the one that licenses the people to be able to drive on the streets. it's not the federal government. i'm not surprised i'm being sued, but that's the law and i'm going to obey my oath of office. >> it is worth noting that according to the arizona republic, the state already grants licenses to noncitizens with work permits. brewer seems to be singling out those who have received their permits through the department of homeland security's executive action. translation, jan brewer is pi
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
this afternoon. earlier today civil rights advocates said they planned to release evidence that shows plans for a surveillance drone in alameda county. the aclu says the sheriff's office plans to use the drone for surveillance and intelligence gathering, contradicting earlier claims it would only be used for search- and-rescue operations. >>> coming up, if the feds can't reach an agreement, maybe the states can help. >> i'm danielle nottingham in washington. coming up, president obama consults a group of the nation's governors on the "fiscal cliff." >> and well wishes are pouring in for will and kate as brits make bets on whether it will be a boy, girl, twins or triplets. >>> hi, i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow live at the whole foods market in cupertino. if you have been looking for a way to help people for the holidays, we have a great idea for you plus we'll talk about that rain coming back all that in just a few minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, typhoon in the philippines. 33 villagers wer >>> at least 74 people are dead or missing following a powerful typhoon in the philippines. >> 33 villa
for support for artistic people that looked nothing like me. this is a civil rights issue. we all have to be included. host: we are talking about the federal response to the rise in optimism with ari ne'eman, the president and co-founder of the artistic self advocacy network -- autistic self advocacy network. our next call comes from florida. go ahead, please. are you there? go right ahead, please. caller: i need to know -- what do you do with a 20-year-old and a 22-year-old that was diagnosed -- has been on medication ever since they were about five years old, and they go from doctor to doctor, and when they take their medication, they look bleary eyed, and we have tried every kind of medication, but they cannot communicate, and the school that they were in -- have been in -- they have been in a group where some of the kids were so bad until they could not -- you cannot learn where there is so much confusion. you can sit down one-on-one with them, and they can pick up some things, and they can easily remember telephone numbers and things that are exciting -- they can remember that, bu
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
civil rights. but as the tool has become a regular tool of political warfare, scrutiny of the procedure has increased and questions raised about its impact on the chamber. now, reid and other senate democrats want to change the rules to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed to formally begin debate on a bill; and require a "talking filibuster," forcing senators to make their case on the floor for hours and hours, like jimmy stewart did in the 1939 film "mr. smith goes to washington." >> i'm not, and i'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause. >> holman: or former south carolina senator strom thurmond, who spoke for over 24 hours in an attempt to defeat the civil rights act of 1957. but in today's senate, where 60 votes are needed to pass almost any piece of legislation, it means even the threat of a filibuster can gum up the process. democratic leader harry reid says enough is enough. >> we have this crazy idea, mr. president, that if we're going to have a filibuster, you have to stand and say something, not hide in your office someplace or go to a wedding that you're h
on diversity and civil rights. arpaio told the arizona republic he can, quote, get along great with the hispanics. the hispanics? not exactly spreading the love. here's what arpaio said after winning re-election despite an aggressively challenge from a latino activist. >> i would hope to get together with the latino community if i could ever have them talk to me without screaming and threatening me. >> let the charm offenser begin. arpaio's long and ugly history of getting together with the latino community includes a justice department lawsuit accusing him of racial profiling, lawsuits linked to alleged civil rights violations, and the death of a prisoner while in custody. and recently saying he'll arm deputies with automatic weapons so they can hunt down suspected and undocumented immigrants. arpaio says now, quote, i sure would like to meet with latino community leaders, in the backroom or whatever, have a couple of beers and try to explain. meet in the backroom? a couple of beers? does arpaio really think a happy hour can erase his offensive record? not even a nice try, she
of constitutional import like civil rights which we all think of the segregationists leaving the floor book on the floor of the senate to hold the bills up. they were pretty big bills but now every single nomination, whether it's for a judgeship or for the assistant secretary of commerce is filibustered in effect and held up and on average now, it takes 188 days for a judge to be confirmed. you have a judicial emergency all over the country with not enough judges. i'll say i actually think there is an argument to be made that you want more consensus on judicial nominations perhaps than not because they're for lifetime but these everyday appointments, budget bills routine bills this isn't about deliberation, the world's greatest deliberative body. it is about someone finding a tool and using it to gum things up and it is time to change the tool. >> eliot: fascinating counter point about the judicial nomination. i hadn't thought about it that way. congressman, i want to come back to you for the last question, unfortunately.
opponents of the ban are unlikely to prove the law violates their civil rights. the plaintiffs say they'll appeal. >> they want tone sure that people who want their professional help are able to seek that out. >> in another lawsuit a federal judge ruled yesterday that two therapists and a student should be exempt from the law while their case is brogue heard. >>> so the south bay where a massive pot grow was discovered inside a home today. we have exclusive video from inside. we're live from san jose police headquarters where officers are still investigating. >> reporter: in the last couple of minutes, i checked with one of the investigators. he says they're still following up leads to find out who is responsible. as we discovered today, the owners of this home seemed just as stunned as anyone else. >> oh, my god. oh, my god. >> only we were there this afternoon as one of the owners came out to see the home after we told him what happened. he says he and his wife had been renting out this house and they had no idea it looked like this on the inside. early this morning neighbors called p
and now a judge needs to sign off on this last- minute deal with civil rights attorneys. instead, they agreed to a compliance director appointed by a judge and paid for by the city. cbs 5 insider phil matier says both sides can claim a partial victory now. >> the plaintiffs will now have someone within the department answerable to the court to make sure that changes are made. most importantly, what they avoid is a complete federal takeover something that would be an embarrassment for the city and could lead it a judge telling them they don't have enough cops and ordering them to hire more. >> according to the "oakland tribune" this makes oakland the first city in the nation to have its police command staff under the authority of a court- appointed director. >>> hundreds of people showed up to talk about crime at an oakland town hall meeting. mayor quan admitted oakland is seeing more violent crime, specifically robberies. police officials talked about programs they are using to fight crime. but a gunfight in the same neighborhood the previous night did not come up at the meeting.
. ♪ get your coupon today at tastelift.coffee-mate.com. >>> civil rights, upholding the constitution, the supreme court makes decisions that impacts us every day. why are they hearing a custody case coming up today? >>> how this could have happened? a cop's gun is fire
, or latino organizations, it's civil rights organizations, the labor movement, it's evangelicals, parts of the business community. there will be immigration reform in 2013 and the president will be forced to sign something that gets through congress whether he wants to or not. it's clear he does want to. >> it appears he wants to. the dream act, here we are in lame duck again, lame duck in 2010 was the great exciting moment for progressives. a thousand things that hadn't happened pineally happened. no particular conversation about another dream act again. >> let's keep in mind. i'm not as optimistic about the future of ledge indication as you. in the context of the immigration problem, immigration policy problem, let's say, in the united states, dreamers and the dream act is symbolic. it aekts a lot of people. it's symbolic in a universe where we have 10 million or 11 million or however many in the shadows. we have 141,000 visas a year. what the hell is that? >> it's that history, right? >> it is that history. >> it's bur okay tra advertised this kind of stuff. it's not a solution of ex
of the same coin. you can take the civil rights battle in the united states, and the right for women to vote, slavery, colonialism, if you add up all the different struggles, altogether, climate change, i would say, dwarfed them. what we are fighting for here is not the survival of the planet. the plan will survive. -- the planet will survive. we are fighting for here is the right of humanity to continue existing on this planet. in a sense, this is about securing our children and their children's future. therefore, the failure to act is a betrayal of our children's futures, a trail of history, a betrayal of common decency. right now, the challenge we also have to throw to the world, there are certain voices that we need to hear more loudly. we need to hear the voices of our religious leaders. every religious text that you pick up you will find some environmental gem of wisdom in it. we are working closer with a trade union movement globally now and building stronger alliances. that is important to move our agenda forward. >> samantha smith, $100 billion was announced by hillary clinton, who
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
station back on new year aday in 2009. at 9:00, two civil rights lawyers will argue before the 9th sir coit court of appeals that b.a.r.t. police should not get legal immin tu from this lawsuit filed bay the -- ill munty from this lawsuit filed by the the -- immunity from this lawsuit filed by the family of oscar grant. >>> coming up at 7:47, how the kansas city chiefs and their community responded to the jovan belcher tragedy. >>> four people including three firefighters are still in the hospital this morning after a serious accident in other rin da. it happened on -- orinda. it happened on eastbound 24 near wilder road. it all started when an suv crashed into the center divide. while one of the drivers and three firefighters were standing on the right shoulder, another suv lost control pushing another car into them. they were all rushed to the hospital with major injuries. >>> the weekend storm brought major problems to the south bay and that had actuallity workers and law enforcement working overtime. a man, woman and child were were stuck in their car after flooding on east capita
in this fashion, and use them in unprecedented numbers. host: and according to history, civil rights was one of those things the filibuster got used for. >> what's interesting about those is while it wasn't a partisan issue, it was a factual issue. dirksen was a great hero of the civil rights revolution right alongside his partner, lyndon johnson. it was the southern democrats, but at the -- that point in time, it was the southern democrats that wanted to talk and one held a record of talking for 24 hours straight. these are filibusters where they don't want to take the floor and they have no interest in debating. it's all to block things. when you get a filibuster when you have bills that pass unanimously, it becomes clear that this was not a matter of principle over a particular bill but a tool of obstruction. host: randy in minnesota, republican line, good morning. go ahead. caller: yes. good morning, c-span. this filibuster thing, this is the perfect way for our government to work the way our government was set up to work with checks and balances. with the filibuster rule, -- i'm getting
come with me on the civil rights bill, you will be remembered for 200 years. only you and lincoln will be remembered. on the other hand, he gave dirkson every public works project dam that was going to sink illinois. lincoln did the same thing, what ever he was needed, assignments, jobs, the years before civil service. it was easier to do some of this then. >> the guy that stole the movie as far as i'm concerned was the same guy that stole that oliver stone movie "jfk" is tommy lee jones. tommy lee jones, playing thaddeus stevens, my hero, the guy that really did believe in emancipation and reconstruction and 40 acres and a mule and wanted to take the freed african-american and make him a full citizen economically, not just under the law. tell me about that guy. we can talk about lincoln forever. thaddeus stevens, his housekeeper was also his mistress. i loved that scene when we discover that. it is a great performance as well as everything else. >> well, what's so powerful about both tommy lee jones performance and the actual thaddeus stevens is what lincoln had to do was to pers
to the podium. she's a civil right and it's also a small business owner. >> thank you, my aunt. my work has been to protect the most vulnerable and i've joined fix the debt because one of the core principles is that we don't go up the fiscal cliff and they don't make sacrifices that crushed the most vulnerable populations. and so, i stand here to speak for those groups. we recognize the importance of doing true reform, true building revenue, true reform and reducing debt where we can, but not at the expense of the state did not for all of us. and all our interests have to be the same. all of us need to contribute to reducing debt to and removing us from this class. it is not an option for an action. if we have not, the people who are least likely to survive it are the ones who will be hit the hardest and hit first. i want to leave you with a bible verse because that's what they do. and it's philippines chapter two verse four. each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others. >> thank you very much. next i'd like to invite up trend to come and media spec
to fight the battle 100 years again with the civil rights movement. good. i think many would make similar claims about world war i and world war ii. if he's trying to make a claim for really van gishing your enemies, that would do it. >> since they took over the house, they've stopped anything from getting done. congress is on track to become the least productive congress since 1947. how much pressure does that put on boehner to make a deal? >> you know, i think it's a really interesting open question, for this reason. they have managed to defy the laws of political gravity in that respect for basically the first four years. their idea is the normal idea of political gravity is that we have to go back to our districts and campaign on something. we have to tell them things that we have done and they have been relatively successful in not obeying that. the question is, does this election change their mind of what their incentives are? >> this is one of the basic rules of american congress, congress vote yes. up don't need to know what the topic or bill is. they tend to move legislation forw
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
heard nothing, he's a civil rights attorney and democratic strategist, richard, what is fascinating to me, it is your former boss bill clinton who signed the defense of marriage act as between a man and woman only. does he regret his decision? >> he says that he regrets it and now he's a strong proponent for same-sex marriages. >> the supreme court will at least take one of these cases. why do you think the court did not come out with a decision on which case to review? >> well, i think that they probably decided that these are complicated issues, in fact they're quite complicated and quite historic and they probably need a little bit more time. but we expect, i think the big news for next week is we expect either tomorrow, monday morning, but at some point next week, maybe as late as friday afternoon, but at some point next week, we're going to start to hear from the supreme court, which cases they will consider, we feel pretty strongly that they will accept for consideration the constitutionality of the defense of marriage act. and the big matter that may come out of the court nex
of the fruitvale bart station. this morning at 9:00 if two oakland civil rights attorneys will be arguing for the ninth circuit court of appeals. arguing bart police officers should not receive legal immunity against a civil lawsuit filed by grant's family. last year a federal judge ruled to allow the lawsuit to move ahead. the police officers appealed that ruling to the ninth circuit court. >>> this is a seventh day of a strike at the nation's busiest port. clerical workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach set up picket lines last tuesday. they have been trying to negotiate a new contract for 2.5 years. they are also claiming their jobs are being outsourced out of the state and across the pacific ocean. now officials at the port deny that charge. the list of the dock workers are not crossing the picket lines and say the strike is costing the port as much as $1 billion every day. >>> major development on treasure island is moving forward. they now have until the end of the month to choose a new home to make way for the development. $1.5billion project includes up to 8,000 new ho
law. a federal court hearing on the case is planned later this month. >>> in a few hours civil rights advocates plan to release evidence they say shows plans for a surveillance drone in alameda county. the aclu says the sheriff's office plans to use a drone for surveillance and intelligence gathering that contradicts earlier claims that it would only be used for search-and- rescue operations. yesterday, a state senator alex padilla put forward a bill to regulate usage. >>> president obama is closely monitoring a week-long strike at two southern california ports. 800 members of the clerical union who work at the port of los angeles and long beach had been working without a contract for more than two years. the clerks don't handle the cargo, but dock workers are now refusing to cross picket lines forcing a shutdown in most terminals in southern california. the los angeles mayor cut short a business trip to south america and landed at l.a.x. last night and has been at the port ever since. >> as the days go by, we're losing billions of dollars according to economic forecasters. that's a b
with the nudist who say the ban violates their civil rights. there will still be permitted events like parade and festivals for those who want to bare all. but that doesn't satisfy the protestors. >> it teaches children that they should be ashamed of their bodies. teach adult they are ashamed of their body. >>reporter: intolerant san francisco supervisor scott weiner says his constituent were tired of seeing a group of naked guys every day. and so he sponsored the city wide ordinance. >> standby the legislation and i'm happy to see it pass and to move on to other things. >>reporter: that's not likely to happen right away. there's now a criminal charge against local blogger michael trellis who posted this picture of scott weiner in second floor bathroom preparing to brush his teeth. what he had tried to take was a picture of the supervisor genital. district attorney george says these an invasion of privacy. >> very, very inappropriate. and we want to make sure we send a message that that type of behavior is not accepted. and many completely trespasses any social boundary of decency. >>
countries should aspire. it's kind of flattering. our civil rights advance, one that was hard fought, but one. so far this treaty has been signed by 154 countries including the u.s. it's been ratified by 126 nations, not including the u.s. president obama, in other words, signed it a couple years ago, but it's not been ratified by the united states senate. to be clear, this treaty would not require anything from us at all. we already have disability rights. it just pushes other countries to do what we have done. we would commit on an international level to what we already believe in here. ratifying that treaty would help us lead the rest of the world to catch up to that historic leap that we took as a country when president bush signed that legislation. with the exception of a black helicopter conspiracy theory on the right championed by failed senator rick santorum, he, who i should mention is a columnist at a birther website, that's his job now, except for his nutso theories ratifying this treaty was a political no brainer. it has bipartisan support. this has the real thing. real b
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it was the first album to sell a million copies. >> rhythm is an international language. >> reporter: his quartet played for presidents and foreign leaders setting the mood for the historic reagan-gorbachev summit in moscow. >> all these people that almost hated each other were swinging. >> reporter: brubeck also used his music to unite a racially divided america becoming one of the first white jazz musicians to play in all black clubs. >> the more has changed with artists, all kinds of artists, the better this world will be. >> reporter: he devoted his life to that goal. he died in norwalk, connecticut, one day before h
. back to you. >> mike, thank you. macarthur accused police are trying to destroy his civil rights. police have declined to comment about the case. >>> the baltimore woman accused of killing her child, is out of the hospital and is being held without bail tonight. mary is live in the newsroom with the latest on this. >> nicole fitzgerald is facing abuse charges in the death of 2- year-old paris. you can see the wound she inflicted on herself attempting to cut her throat. when officers arrived at her home, they found a 32-year-old holding a knife. they found her son dead from multiple stab wounds. fitzgerald is also charged with assault and reckless endangerment. denise? >> the little boy's aunt and uncle say fitzgerald has been dealing with health problems. >>> a man is arrested after going off an embankment. just after noon today. the car went off winter's run road. coming to a stop. rescue crews pulled a 21-year- old man from the car and he was flown to shock trauma. his condition is unknown at this point. >>> another troubling incident tonigh
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
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